FAMILY MEDIATION

As of March 2021 it is recommended that indiviudals to seek family mediators support before moving to arbitration and court process.

Parenting Plan

Allow our family mediators to help you come up with a parenting plan that not only has your voice but your child voice in the plan.

Welcome to Collaborative Mediation Law

We are a not-for-profit organization designed to support families in your community. We serve all across Ontario and Canada. Our services are provided in-person and virtually.

All Mediation services are $85/hr, Arbitration mattera are $200/hr, Parent Co-ordinator services are $120/hr, Voice Of The Child Report is $85/hr

Services We Provide:

  • Re-evaluation of Parenting Schedule 
  • Child-Closed Mediation
  • Voice of the Child Report
  • Mediation / Arbitration
  • Parent Coordinator
  • Common-law Rights & Support
  • Mortgage Transfer During Relationship Breakup
  • Parenting Alienation
  • Holiday & Overnight Access
  • Grandparents & Parenting Schedules
  • Retroactive Support
1574+ Satisfied
Clients

Seminars & Podcasts

Our seminars and podcasts help you and your family move forward and cope with the trauma of separation and divorce.

We can help. Don't let frustration control your judgement.

Breaking up is hard to do, but it gets easier with the right advice and guidance. Our professional team is here to advise, guide and support you and your child's emotional well being and plan your asset separation and financial transition.
Collaborative Mediation Law - Ontario's Premier Mediation and Separation Services

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Frequently asked
questions

Breaking up is tough on your family, children and yourself, but it will be alright!. Visit our FAQ and Contact Us for Free consultation today.
  • When it comes to the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which separated parent is entitled to it?

    Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is responsible for administering the Canada Child Tax Benefit. The benefit is a tax-free monthly payment for children under the age of 18 and is intended to help families with the cost of raising their children.

    In situations involving separated or divorced parents, CRA pays the benefit to the parent who resides with the child and who primarily fulfils the responsibility for the care and the upbringing of the child. According to CRA, this is generally the mother, and therefore in situations of separation or divorce, CRA presumes the mother to be entitled to the benefit.

    In cases where both parents claim the benefit, CRA will conduct a review to determine which parent qualifies for the benefit. If it is determined that the child resides with both parents, CRA will pay one parent for six months and then rotate the payments to the other parent for the next six months.

    Details of this and further information can be obtained at the CRA website at www.cra-arc.gc.ca or by calling toll free 1-800-387-1193.

  • Do you have to increase your child support when your income rises?

    In the 2003 decision of Walsh v. Walsh, the wife asked the judge to order her ex-husband to pay a shortfall of child support in the sum of $43,000 for the past few years because his income rose.

    In 1997, the court ordered her ex-husband to pay child support pursuant to the Child Support Guidelines based on an income of $175,000. In 2002, the wife discovered that her ex-husband’s income ranged between $214,000 and $376,000 per year for the past few years resulting in a shortfall of approximately $43,000, which her ex-husband should have paid in child support.

    The court held that her ex-husband knew that his child support obligation was based on his income, but chose not to disclose his income voluntarily. In the court’s view, he could not now hide behind the defence that the children should not have the benefit of his increased income for this period because his wife did not request his income tax returns until 2002. The ex-husband was ordered to pay the entire shortfall in child support within 45 days.

  • What are the different types of mediation?

    Before mediation begins, the spouses will decide whether the mediation will be open or closed. In open mediation, the mediator may be asked by either spouse to write a full report on what happened during the mediation including the reasons why it was not successful. If the mediation is not successful and the case proceeds to court, the report may be considered by the judge. Also, the mediator may be required by either spouse to testify in court. In closed mediation, the information exchanged by the spouses is confidential. The mediator’s report will only mention whether an agreement was reached, but will not provide any details of why an agreement was not reached. In closed mediation, neither spouse can compel the mediator to testify in court.

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