FAMILY MEDIATION

As of March 2021 it is recommended that indiviudals to seek family mediators support before moving to arbitration and court process.

Parenting Plan

Allow our family mediators to help you come up with a parenting plan that not only has your voice but your child voice in the plan.

Welcome to Collaborative Mediation Law

We are a not-for-profit organization designed to support families in your community. We serve all across Ontario and Canada. Our services are provided in-person and virtually.

All Mediation services are $120/hr, Arbitration matters are $240/hr, Parent Co-ordinator services are $120/hr, Voice Of The Child Report is $180/hr

Services We Provide:

  • Re-evaluation of Parenting Schedule 
  • Child-Closed Mediation
  • Voice of the Child Report
  • Mediation / Arbitration
  • Parent Coordinator
  • Common-law Rights & Support
  • Mortgage Transfer During Relationship Breakup
  • Parenting Alienation
  • Holiday & Overnight Access
  • Grandparents & Parenting Schedules
  • Retroactive Support
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Seminars & Podcasts

Our seminars and podcasts help you and your family move forward and cope with the trauma of separation and divorce.

We can help. Don't let frustration control your judgement.

Breaking up is hard to do, but it gets easier with the right advice and guidance. Our professional team is here to advise, guide and support you and your child's emotional well being and plan your asset separation and financial transition.
Collaborative Mediation Law - Ontario's Premier Mediation and Separation Services

What Our CLients Said

Frequently asked
questions

Breaking up is tough on your family, children and yourself, but it will be alright!. Visit our FAQ and Contact Us for Free consultation today.
  • Is mediation really voluntary?

    Let’s be honest… Separating spouses are not running to line up for any process to commemorate the death of their relationship. The separating spouse is usually in pain, angry, confused, scared and hopeless.

    She is wanting to run away from the ruins of her marriage. She is not volunteering for anything at this stage of her life.

    As an aside, the most satisfied client of mine, after thanking me for providing them with excellent and compassionate legal representation, follows the compliment with “I hope I never need to use you again.”

    When we use the term ‘voluntary’ we must recount the context… not from our perspective (we meet hundreds of separating spouses, whereas the client meets one Family law lawyer and we are in and out of courthouses almost daily, which does not cause us anxiety, whereas the very presence of a separating spouse in a courthouse causes tremendous stress and anxiety for her), but from the perspective of the client who never planned for this, wishes the pain would stop and feels helpless.

    Can a person in this emotional state really be acting with volition and intent ?

    When a spouse finds herself in this situation, she speaks to her friends and family, makes inquiries of what to do next and, eventually, lands in the office of a professional (therapist, lawyer and/or mediator) who guides her to the next step.

    When this person ‘volunteers’ for mediation as a ‘process’, she is usually choosing the least of all poisons. The other alternatives are not available (reconciliation), not affordable (litigation) or impractical (doing nothing).

    Another way to look at it stems from my observations on Wednesdays at the Family Court of the Superior Court of Justice in Newmarket. Wednesdays is motions day. Between 30 to 50 motions are on the docket each Wednesday. There is no limit placed on this list. There is no case management. There is no planning. It’s a free for all. Each Wednesday, separating spouses and counsel line up at 10:00 a.m. to seek judicial intervention. There is a problem in the lives of these spouses. They could not resolve them. Their lawyers could not resolve them. They are nervous, worried and anxious…but hopeful. They hope that the motions’ judge will hear their problem and declare a solution.

    That can’t happen. Why ?

    One motions’ judge cannot solve 30-50 domestic problems between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. S/he may be able to help a few families. This of course starts after those spouses who have given up, failed to confirm their court attendance in advance, failed to attend court that day or have already resolved their dispute, are managed by the court. This usually takes 30 to 90 minutes. That is when the motions’ judge announces that the remaining time in the day is not adequate to help the many remaining spouses in waiting.

    Now for the notion of ‘volunteering for mediation’.

    The motions’ judge announces that this court location offers mediation services. It is free and available. The judge reminds everyone that, regrettably, s/he cannot help most of those in the room.

    So the spouses and counsel, in utter disappointment, consider the alternatives (leaving court with no solution, coming back next Wednesday and hoping to be heard, booking a fixed motion date in 4 months or… ‘volunteering for mediation’).

    It is arguable that in these situations a person is acting under duress or desperation when opting for mediation.

    Don’t get me wrong. Mediation may be the very best option for this family. It may preserve the relationship… ensure mutual respect… permit the discovery of a cooperative solution… end the conflict… and save money.

    But I query whether mediation was voluntary.

  • How do I know if mediation is right for me?

    Mediation is an opportunity to try to settle your case. In most cases, we are able to help parties have productive conversations with the mediator. But it is not right for everyone. If you and the other party are both willing to try to reach an agreement rather than have the court decide for you, we suggest you submit your intake forms and schedule separate intake meetings. This will help you and us decide if mediation is suitable in your case. Even if you do not proceed with mediation, you will both receive good information and supportive referrals.

  • What is an uncontested divorce?

    When the spouses have signed a separation agreement that has resolved all issues such as custody, access, support and property division, and they now both want to be divorced, then one of the spouses can commence an application for divorce that consists of a request for a divorce only. One spouse has it served on the other spouse. If the other spouse agrees to a divorce, then he or she may choose not to contest the application for divorce. That is why it is called an uncontested divorce.

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