FAMILY MEDIATION

As of March 2021 it is recommended that indiviudals to seek family mediators support before moving to arbitration and court process.

Parenting Plan

Allow our family mediators to help you come up with a parenting plan that not only has your voice but your child voice in the plan.

Welcome to Collaborative Mediation Law

Compromise and collaboration are the cornerstones of every negotiation. For couples going through a break up, separation or divorce, we offer more effective and respectful approaches in dissolving a relationship or a marriage, while supporting your children's emotional well being.

With litigation and court there is only one winner, but at the end the whole family loses and children are the victims. Through mediation you are able to :
  • Get back to living again.
  • Reduce time, stress, and expense.
  • Keep moving ahead.
  • Use the right professionals at the right time.
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Clients

Seminars & Podcasts

Our seminars and podcasts help you and your family move forward and cope with the trauma of separation and divorce.

We can help. Don't let frustration control your judgement.

Breaking up is hard to do, but it gets easier with the right advice and guidance. Our professional team is here to advise, guide and support you and your child's emotional well being and plan your asset separation and financial transition.
Collaborative Mediation Law - Ontario's Premier Mediation and Separation Services

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Frequently asked
questions

Breaking up is tough on your family, children and yourself, but it will be alright!. Visit our FAQ and Contact Us for Free consultation today.
  • Who pays child support?

    A parent who does not have day-to-day care and control of the children usually will be responsible for paying child support. The amount is based on that parent’s income and on the special and extraordinary expenses of the children.

  • What is a DRO?

    A dispute resolution officer (DRO) is a lawyer who is a member in good standing of the Law Society of Upper Canada, has practiced primarily in the field of family law for a minimum of ten years, and has been appointed to assist the judges and the court system. At Toronto’s divorce court—the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the DRO meets with separated spouses before their case proceeds to a hearing before a judge to attempt to resolve their case, or at least to narrowly define the issues and create a timetable to proceed to a hearing.

    DRO’s are typically involved in cases where one spouse is applying to the court to change a child support order or to change the parenting plan. The programme has been very successful. Approximately two-thirds of the cases are settled by the DRO without proceeding before a judge. Those cases that do proceed to a hearing before a judge have benefited by the DRO assisting the parties in defining the issues and ensuring that the proper evidence is submitted to the judge.

  • Can a support payor take early retirement?

    The Ontario Superior Court of Justice was asked to address this very question in the September 30, 2003 case of Moffatt v. Moffatt. After the couple separated in 1997, they entered into a separation agreement that placed their two children with the mother. The father was a teacher and earned $63,000 per year. In June 2001, he took advantage of a temporary window of opportunity and chose to take early retirement. He accepted the converted value of his teachers’ pension in the sum of $526,026.63 and left the workforce.

    Mr. Justice Campbell decided that the father, by choice, had become intentionally under-employed as described in section 19 of the Child Support Guidelines. The court decided that the father made a decision to benefit himself and himself only. Because the father was only 54 years old when he took early retirement, and because he had an ongoing obligation to his two children, his decision had a significant negative impact on his two children.

    The father was ordered to pay child support for his children in the amount of $929 per month based upon an attributed income of $70,200 per year that would continue up to the date when he otherwise would have been entitled to retire.

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